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Meet the Faculty

Dr. Barry Waterson, M.A., Psya.D. Cert.Psya., Licensed Psychologist

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Personal Statement

My interest, training and teaching in Modern Psychoanalysis have continued throughout a career in Vermont Mental Health Centers, schools and private community practice in rural Vermont. Work with children and families with severe mental health difficulties has been enriched with training and techniques to address personality disorders as manifested by parents and as mirrored in the emotional development of their children.

This interest in children and parents led to my doctoral research in disorganized attachment and ways that Modern Psychoanalytic Technique could be understood and developed as an intervention with severely disturbed children. In the course of that research I have been pleased to be able to collaborate with psychoanalytic colleagues both in and out of Modern Psychoanalysis. What I have found is that the earlier rifts in theory and technique now appear to be converging again, and that much of Modern Psychoanalytic technique is supported by theories of mentalization and attachment in current psychoanalytic and neuropsychoanalytic research.

I enjoy teaching and training students from a variety of cultures and backgrounds and look forward to a renaissance of psychodynamic interventions aimed at prevention and intervention with severe mental and emotional disorders.

Education

Psya.D., Vermont Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 2007.
Cert.Psya., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1999.
M.A., Rhode Island College, 1973.

Awards & Honors

Research Fellow of the International Psychoanalytic Association, 2005
Vermont Association of Psychoanalytic Studies Research Award, 2007

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Thomas Twyman, MSSW, Cert.Psya., Co-Director of Clinical Studies

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Personal Statement

Psychoanalysis, maligned from a variety of perspectives for the last several decades, now finds itself once again, on the cutting edge of the exploration of what makes us humans so human. To be involved in such exploration is indeed a rewarding and fulfilling endeavor.

Education

Psya.D., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis.
Cert.Psya., Boston Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, 1993.
M.S.S., Boston University School of Social Work, 1978.
M.Div., Virginia Theological Seminary, 1965.

Research

The understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of what is called "the borderline condition." A few of my questions are: from what exactly does the borderline patient suffer, how did he get this way, what is necessary if he is to be helped? I wonder if the borderline condition is in itself a third and distinct condition, not simply some sort of variation or mixture of neurosis and/or psychosis.

Meet the Faculty

Dr. William Sharp, Psya.D., Program Director for the Masters of Mental Health Counseling

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Personal Statement

William Sharp was a high school social studies teacher who became interested in why some students learn and some did not. This interest in the individual’s mind brought him to the study of psychoanalysis. He currently has a private practice in Brookline village for adult, children, and groups.

In addition to teaching at BGSP, he teaches at Northeastern University and Wheelock College where he encourages psychoanalytic research and thinking. Dr Sharp consults with schools and teachers in the Boston area helping them reach children that are often hard to reach due to emotional blocks to learning.

His interests also include writing and movie discussions. He has led talks at BGSP on how film reflects human drives in such movies as: Lars and The Real Girl, Brokeback Mountain, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Warm Bodies. You can learn more about his presentations by following him on Twitter @DrWilliamSharp

Education

Psya.D., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 2010.
M.A., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 2009.
M.A., Rowan University, 1998.

Publications

 

Refereed Articles

Goldman, S. B. & Sharp, W. (2019). Into the Fire: Using Process to Teach Undergraduate Clinical Psychology. Group, 43(1), 45-59.

Sharp, W. & Ahmed, K. (2016). Talk and Action: Iatrogenic Effects and the Research Practitioner Balance. Group, 40(3),456--476.

Sharp, W. (2015). [Review of the book Psychoanalysis in an age of accelerating change: Spiritual Globalization by Neil Altman]. Modern Psychoanalysis. 40(1), 95-99.

Sharp, W. (2014). Sticks and Stones, But What About Words? International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 64(3), 281-296.

Sharp, W. (2007). [Review of the book Practical Psychoanalysis for therapists and patients by Owen Renik]. Modern Psychoanalysis, 32(1), 106-110.

Books

Sharp, W. (2016). Talking Helps: An Evidence-Based Approach to Psychoanalytic Counseling (First Edition). San Diego, CA: Cognella Inc., 194pp.

Chapters in Edited Books

Sharp, W. (2019). Psychoanalysis . In T. Langley (Ed.) The Joker Psychology: Evil Clowns and the Women Who Love Them (p293). New York: Sterling Press.

Sharp, W. (2018). Why Being Blind to the Devil Inside Stunts Emotional Growth. In T. Langley (Ed.) Dare Devil Psychology: The Devil You Know (p187-198). New York: Sterling Press.

Sharp, W. (2016). The Unconscious: What, When, Where, Why and of Course Who. In T. Langley (Ed.) Dr. Who Psychology: Madman with a Box (p53-61). New York: Sterling Press.

Sharp, W. (2016). Id, Superego, Egoless: Where Is the I in Who? In T. Langley (Ed.) Dr. Who Psychology: Madman with a Box (p63-71). New York: Sterling Press.

Public Outreach

Sharp, W. (August 27, 2015). Back to school: A Crucial time for kids social and emotional development. The Conversation.

Sharp, W. (October 22, 2015). To Speak or Not to Speak: How to Talk to Kids About Social Issues. Boston Parents Magazine.

Cited In

Cohan, A. (January 14, 2019). Social media offers ‘no escape’ for bullying victims. Retrieved from: https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/01/13/social-media-offers-no-escape-for-bullying-victims/

Cohan, A. (January 14, 2019). Body shaming follows students online and at school. Retrieved from: https://www.bostonherald.com/2019/01/13/body-shaming-follows-students-online-and-at-school/

McKiernan, K. (January 3, 2017). Special Report: Schools face surge in suicide attempts. Retrieved from: http://www.bostonherald.com/news/local_coverage/2017/01/special_report_schools_face_surge_in_suicide_attempts

Wecker, M. (May 15, 2015). Happier students tend to have higher GPAs. Deseret NewsRetrieved from:

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865628507/Happier-students-tend-to-have-higher-GPAs.html?pg=all

Parents Magazine. (September 2015). How to make the charter school choice. Parents Magazine. Retrieved from:http://www.parents.com/print/81307/

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Dena Reed, Psya.D.

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Personal Statement

Education

Cert. Psya., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1990.
M.D., Medical College of Wisconsin, 1979.
B.S., New York University, 1973.

Publications

(1992) "The Development of Acute Transient Migraines During Psychoanalytic Treatment" Modern Psychoanalysis, Vol.17, #2

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Stephen Price, Ph.D., Cert. Psya., Faculty, BGSP

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Personal Statement

I was in the original classes in 1976 at BGSP (then Boston Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies) and have been a practicing psychoanalyst since 1978. What attracted me to the center was my interest in how people manage the aggressive drive. This has allowed me to work with populations that were thought previously to be “not suitable for treatment,” – the poor and the mentally retarded. Using modern analytic techniques with these people has been especially rewarding.

Education

Cert Psya., Boston Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, 1989.
Ph.D., Brandeis University, Heller School, 1979.
M.P.A., New York University, 1975.
BA Harvard College, 1961.

Research

Institutional transference, the relation between creativity and mental disorders

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Vincent Panetta, Ph.D., Cert.Psya.

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Personal Statement

I became fascinated with psychoanalysis when I was a college student. I had a professor who was an analyst; he had been trained by Anna Freud. Not only did I take all the courses he taught, but I would go to the library on my own to read the works of Freud. It was my good fortune to stumble upon BGSP (then BCMPS) in 1979, the year I graduated from college. I knew then that I wanted to start my training as an analyst, and I did.

Since then, I have used my psychoanalytic training to work both in private practice and with challenging clients in community mental health.

At BGSP, I enjoy working as a teacher, supervisor, and training analyst.  I came to this country from Italy when I was 13, and I especially appreciate the challenges facing international students.

Education

Ph.D., Greenwich University, 1996.
Cert. Psya., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1995.
M.Ed., Boston State College, 1981.

Research

Fantasy, addiction, applied analysis in community mental health, parenting.

Publications

(2000) Panetta, V. Fantasy as Resistance. Modern Psychoanalysis27, 101-111.
Homosexual Fantasy in a Modern Psychoanalysis (unpublished paper)
Fantasy, Impulsivity, and Acting Out (dissertation)

Meet the Faculty

Ms. Faye Newsome, M.A., Cert.Psya., NYS Licensed Psychoanalyst, Co-Director of Clinical Studies, Liaison

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Personal Statement

In the past year I have developed the course “How the Mind Unfolds,” which integrates neuroscience, observational studies and various psychoanalytic theories in order to lead students to address the controversies about the concepts of projection, projective identification and imitation. The question addressed by the class is how the neonate progresses from sensation through to the birth of the other. Developing this course has led to further work in the clinical area of how the concept of envy can be applied to the modern analytic concept of the narcissistic defense.
I have concentrated on clinical issues in my psychoanalytic career, focusing on teaching students to tolerate and learn about themselves and others through their work with patients in mental hospitals, day facilities, addiction programs, and in their work with patients in the Treatment Service which forms the foundation for their private practice.
Teaching the techniques of exploration, journey, mirroring and reflecting (types of modern analytical interventions) is an intense experience for students who have new thoughts and feelings about themselves as they use theories of techniques to work with the resistances of their patients.

Education

M.A., California Graduate Institute, 1986.
Cert. Psya., Center for Modern Psychoanalytic Studies, 1985.

Meet the Faculty

Dr. John Madonna, Ed.D., Cert.Psya.

Contact Information

Personal Statement

I came to psychoanalysis twenty-five years ago as a part of an ongoing quest to know more about the deeper forces that compel human behavior. The evolution from education and clinical psychology was a natural one, and very exciting. In private practice since 1981, I have worked extensively with people from all walks of life who have been engaged variously in struggles for psychic freedom and emotional well-being. A particular and long-standing interest has been working with those who serve: clinicians, police, clergy, and religious who in their efforts on behalf of others run perilous risks.

Education

Cert. Psya., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1997.
Ed.D., Clark University, 1980.
C.A.G.S., Assumption College, 1976.
M.A., Assumption College, 1973.
M.A., Assumption College, 1970.

Research

Effects of transparency, mutuality, and emotional contact in psychoanalytic treatment;
Trauma, stress and recovery in the helping professions.
Psychopathology in individual and marital relationships.

Publications

(2005) Madonna, J. Stress Response: The Psychological Risks. Forensische Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie and International Association for Forensic Psychotherapy. Forthcoming.
(2002) Madonna, J. and Kelly, R. Treating Police Stress. Springfield Illinois, Charles Thomas Publishers.
(1996) Ciottone, R. and Madonna, J. Play Therapy Treatment of Sexually Abused Children: A Synergistic Clinical Developmental Approach. Northvale New Jersey, Jason Aronson, Inc.
(1993) Ciottone, R. and Madonna, J. Critical issues in the treatment of a sexually abused latency aged boy. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing. Vol. 16, 31-40.
(1991) Madonna, J. Countertransference issues in the treatment of borderline and narcissistic personality disorders: a retrospective on the contributions of Gerald Adler, Peter Giovacchini, Harold Searles and Phyllis Meadow. Modern Psychoanalysis. Vol. 16, No.1, 35-64.
(1990) Madonna, J. An integrated approach to the treatment of a specific phobia in a nine year old boy. Phobia Practice and Research Journal. Vol. 3, No. 2. 95-106.
(1986) Madonna, J. A treatment of a case of marital abuse. American Journal of Family Therapy. Vol. 14, No. 3. 235-246.
(1986) Madonna, J. and Chandler, R. Aggressive play and bereavement in group therapy with latency-aged boys. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. Vol. 3, No. 2, 109-114.
(1984) Ciottone, R. and Madonna, J. The treatment of elective mutism: the economics of an integrated approach. Techniques: A Journal for Remedial Education and Counseling. Vol. 1, 23-30.
(1984) Madonna, J. and Ciottone, R. A family systems orientation to the problem of firesetting. In Family Therapy Techniques for Problem Behaviors of Children and Teenager, Charles Schaefer et al (eds.), San Francisco: Jossey Bass Publishers, 80-82.
(1984) Roix, G. and Madonna, J. Eliminating firesetting behavior through an ecological approach with the family. In Family Therapy Techniques for Problem Behaviors of Children and Teenager, Charles Schaefer et al (eds.), San Francisco: Jossey Bass Publishers, 83-85.
(1984) Madonna, J. and Berkovitz, T. Prescribing the system: an example of paradox in incest treatment. Journal of Family Therapy. Vol. 1, No. 2. 39-50.

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Leila Karam

Personal Statement

Meet the Faculty

Dr. Patricia Hugenberger, Psya.D., Cert. Psya., M.A., M.S.W.

Contact Information

Personal Statement

My interest in psychoanalysis began to take shape many years ago when I read a psychological evaluation of a three year old boy who was in a day care center where I worked as social worker. This boy had serious behavioral problems and the report addressed possible unconscious motivations. I remember thinking that I wanted to better understand the power of the unconscious and how to work with this little boy. This led me to pursue an MSW at Simmons, which at the time had a psychoanalytic clinical tract. After Simmons a friend steered me to BGSP where the intense and therapeutic study of the unconscious have provided me with a rich professional and personal experience. Modern psychoanalysis has helped me understand and work with patients in community mental health centers where I worked for twenty years, in school systems, and in private practice.

Psychoanalysis has also offered me enhanced pleasure with its application to understanding the world in general, both in politics and the arts, especially music, movies and television. My dissertation research draws on this appreciation of a deeper, more complicated view of human behavior, especially as it manifests itself in everyday life.

Education

Psya.D., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 2012.
Cert. Psya., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 2003.
M.A., Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, 1997.
M.S.W., Simmons School of Social Work, 1981.